Indiamart
Lucky Pharmaceutical Company
Bagaha, Bihar

Pharmaceutical Tablets

We are leading Supplier & Manufacturer for the Pharmaceutical Tablets which also includes Sennosides Chewable Tablet & Acetaminophen Brompheniramine Pseudoephedrine Tablets since 2012

Sennosides Chewable Tablet

Sennosides Chewable Tablet

Usage

Read the leaflet provided with this medicine carefully. Consult your pharmacist or doctor if you are unable to understand any information.

  • Take Sennosides by mouth with or without food.
  • Take Sennosides with full glass of water (approx. 240 ml).
  • Chew Sennosides tablet or allow it to dissolve in your mouth.
  • While using Sennosides it is recommended to take extra fluids.
  • Best time to take Sennosides Chewable Tablets is at bedtime.
  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.
  • Brand Name

    Ex-Lax Chewable Tablets

  • Do NOT use this medicine if:

    • You are allergic to any ingredient in Sennosides.
    • You have appendicitis, difficulty swallowing, intestinal blockage, severe constipation, or rectal bleeding.
    • You are having abdominal surgery. Contact your doctor immediately if any of these apply to you.
    • Important safety information

      • Do not use Sennosides for longer than 1 week or exceed the recommended dose without consulting your doctor. Otherwise there is risk of loss of normal bowel function.
      • If you feel abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or rectal bleeding do not use Sennosides except under the direction of your doctor.
      • If you feel change in bowel habits that lasts for 2 weeks or more, do not use Sennosides. Consult your doctor for detailed information.
      • Do not take additional laxatives with Sennosides unless directed by your doctor.
      • After use of Sennosides if you feel rectal bleeding or failure to have a bowel movement within 12 hours. Stop use and contact doctor immediately.
      • If condition gets worse or does not get better within 1 week, consult your doctor.
      • Urine may be discolored pink to red, or yellow to brown with use of Sennosides.
      • Sennosides should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 6 years, as safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed.
      • PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Sennosides while you are pregnant. It is not known if Sennosides is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feeding while you use Sennosides, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using Sennosides, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist
      • Precautions

        Store Sennosides between 20-25°C away from light and moisture. Keep all medicines away from children

      • Side Effects

        COMMON: Stomach discomfort, cramps, diarrhea, nausea.

         

        Severe: Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but SERIOUS side effects occur

        • Severe allergic reactions: rash, hives, itching, difficulty breathing, tightness in the chest, swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue.
        • Poor bowel function
        • Kidney inflammation
        • Rectal bleeding. This is not a complete list of all possible side effects. Contact your healthcare provider or pharmacist to know more.

       

Acetaminophen Brompheniramine Pseudoephedrine Tablets

Acetaminophen Brompheniramine Pseudoephedrine Tablets

Acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine is used for:

Relieving symptoms of colds, hay fever, and allergies such as headache, sinus pain, nasal and sinus congestion, sneezing, watery eyes, runny nose, fever, and itching of the nose or throat. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine is an antihistamine, decongestant, and pain reliever combination. It works by blocking histamine, a substance in the body that causes sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes. It also relieves nasal congestion and pain associated with sinus pressure, and dries the nose and chest.


  • You are allergic to any ingredient in acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine
  • You are taking sodium oxybate (GHB) or you have taken furazolidone or a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, phenelzine) within the last 14 days
  • You have severe high blood pressure, severe heart blood vessel disease, rapid heartbeat, or severe heart problems
  • You are unable to urinate or are having an asthma attack

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.


  • Acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine. Using acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine alone, with certain other medicines, or with alcohol may lessen your ability to drive or perform other potentially dangerous tasks.
  • Acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine will add to the effects of alcohol and other depressants. Ask your pharmacist if you have questions about which medicines are depressants.
  • Do not exceed the recommended dose of acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine. Doing so will not improve your condition faster and may increase your risk for side effects.
  • If your symptoms do not improve within a few days or if they become worse, check with your doctor.
  • Acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine contains acetaminophen, brompheniramine, and pseudoephedrine. Before you begin taking any new prescription or nonprescription medicine, read the ingredients to see if it also contains acetaminophen, brompheniramine, or pseudoephedrine. If it does or if you are uncertain, contact your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Do not take diet or appetite control medicines while you are taking acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine without checking with your doctor.
  • If you consume 3 or more alcohol-containing drinks every day, ask your doctor whether you should take acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine or other pain relievers/fever reducers. Acetaminophen may cause liver damage. Alcohol use combined with acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine may increase your risk for liver damage.
  • If you are scheduled for allergy skin testing, do not take acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine for several days before the test because it may decrease your response to the skin tests.
  • If you have trouble sleeping, ask your doctor or pharmacist about the best time of the day to take acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine.
  • Caution is advised when using acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine in the ELDERLY because they may be more sensitive to its effects.
  • Use acetaminophen/brompheniramine/pseudoephedrine with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 12 years of age. 

Abacavir Lamivudine Zidovudine Tablets

Abacavir Lamivudine Zidovudine Tablets

GENERIC NAME: abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudineBRAND NAME: Trizivir

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Trizivir is a combination oral medication that is used for treating infections with the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV). Trizivir contains abacavir (Ziagen), lamivudine (Epivir) and zidovudine (Retrovir), which are three different anti-HIV drugs with different mechanisms of action. Anti-HIV drugs are often used in combination to increase HIV suppression and to reduce the chance of the HIV virus developing resistance to any single drug. Combining these three drugs into one pill reduces the number of individual medications that a patient has to take, which makes it easier for patients to comply with therapy. Administration of one tablet of Trizivir is equal to giving 300 mg of abacavir, 150 mg of lamivudine and 300 mg of zidovudine together. Trizivir does not reduce the transmission of HIV among individuals, and it does not cure HIV or AIDS. Trizivir was approved by the FDA in November, 2000.

SIDE EFFECTS: Trizivir causes the same side effect as its component drugs, abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine. The most common side effects are nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and difficulty sleeping.

Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions involving several organs have been associated with abacavir, a compnent of Trizivir. Symptoms include fever, rash, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, aches, shortness of breath, couth, and sore throat. Patients should discontinue Trizivir if a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected. Patients who carry a certain genetic marker called HLA-B 5701 are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Screening for the HLA-B 5701 allele is recommended prior to initiating therapy with abacavir. 

 

Abacavir Tablet

Abacavir Tablet

Abacavir (ABCi/.bæk..vr/ is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor(NRTI) used to treat HIV and AIDS. It is available under the trade name Ziagen (ViiV Healthcare) and in the combination formulations Trizivir (abacavir, zidovudine andlamivudine) and Kivexa/Epzicom (abacavir and lamivudine). It has been well tolerated: the main side effect is hypersensitivity, which can be severe, and in rare cases, fatal. Genetic testing can indicate whether an individual will be hypersensitive; over 90% of patients can safely take abacavir. However, in a separate study, the risk of heart attack increased by nearly 90%.[1]

Viral strains that are resistant to zidovudine (AZT) or lamivudine (3TC) are generally sensitive to abacavir, whereas some strains that are resistant to AZT and 3TC are not as sensitive to abacavir.
Clinical indications

Abacavir tablets and oral solution, in combination with other antiretroviral agents, are indicated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

Abacavir should always be used in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Abacavir should not be added as a single agent when antiretroviral regimens are changed due to loss of virologic response.
Side effects

Fatal hypersensitivity reactions have been associated with therapy with abacavir. Symptoms of hypersensitivity include fever, skin rash, fatigue, gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or abdominal pain and respiratory symptoms such as pharyngitis, dyspnea, or cough.

Hypersensitivity is strongly associated with HLA-B*57:01[2][3][4] for which testing is now available in most western countries. There is a strong relationship with race: the prevalence of HLA-B*57:01 in some Indian ethnic groups is up to 10%, but is 0% in Japan; the prevalence is 5–7% in western Europe. Screening for the HLA-B*57:01 has been convincingly shown to reduce the incidence of abacavir hypersensitivity reactions.[5][6]Abacavir binds specificially to the peptide-binding groove of HLA-B*57:01 and thereby alters the spectrum of peptides that bind to this molecule. This in turn leads to aberrant CD8 T-cell responses to self-antigens, which probably explain the side effect.[7][8]

A new FDA alert concerning abacavir and abacavir containing medications was issued on July 24, 2008. FDA informed that based on data from two studies they support a recommendation for pre-therapy screening for the presence of the HLA-B*57:01 allele and the selection of alternative therapy in positive subjects. Genetic tests for HLA-B*57:01 are available and all patients should be screened for the HLA-B*57:01 allele before starting or restarting treatment with abacavir or abacavir containing medications. Development of clinically suspected abacavir HSR requires immediate and permanent discontinuation of abacavir therapy in all patients, including patients negative for HLA-B*57:01.[9] On March 1, 2011 the FDA updated the public about an ongoing safety review of abacavir and a possible increased risk of heart attack.[10] 

 

Abacavir Lamivudine Zidovudine Tablets

Abacavir Lamivudine Zidovudine Tablets

GENERIC NAME: abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudineBRAND NAME: Trizivir

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Trizivir is a combination oral medication that is used for treating infections with the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV). Trizivir contains abacavir (Ziagen), lamivudine (Epivir) and zidovudine (Retrovir), which are three different anti-HIV drugs with different mechanisms of action. Anti-HIV drugs are often used in combination to increase HIV suppression and to reduce the chance of the HIV virus developing resistance to any single drug. Combining these three drugs into one pill reduces the number of individual medications that a patient has to take, which makes it easier for patients to comply with therapy. Administration of one tablet of Trizivir is equal to giving 300 mg of abacavir, 150 mg of lamivudine and 300 mg of zidovudine together. Trizivir does not reduce the transmission of HIV among individuals, and it does not cure HIV or AIDS. Trizivir was approved by the FDA in November, 2000.

SIDE EFFECTS: Trizivir causes the same side effect as its component drugs, abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine. The most common side effects are nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and difficulty sleeping.

Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions involving several organs have been associated with abacavir, a compnent of Trizivir. Symptoms include fever, rash, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, aches, shortness of breath, couth, and sore throat. Patients should discontinue Trizivir if a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected. Patients who carry a certain genetic marker called HLA-B 5701 are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Screening for the HLA-B 5701 allele is recommended prior to initiating therapy with abacavir. 

 

Saridon

Saridon

Saridon is an analgesic combination indicated for the management of headache. The currently global base formulation contains 135mg of propyphenazone, 260 mg of paracetamol and 55 mg of caffeine.[1] The combination is designed and said to produce effective analgesia with fast onset of action in 15 minutes, as compared to paracetamol, ibuprofen, or aspirin alone.

It was first launched by Roche in 1933, containing initially pyrithyldione and phenacetin, widely used remedies for fever and pain. It often took on the form “A.P.C” (aspirin-phenacetin-caffeine) but Saridon was reformulated in 1981; replacing the original ingredient phenacetin with paracetamol before the US FDA recall in 1983. It is available in more than 80 countries across Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa.
General informationGenericCaffeine, Paracetamol, Propyphenazone[2]

PPD Drug Class: Analgesics/ Non-Narcotic Analgesics/ Para-Aminophenol Derivatives

Needs a PrescriptionNoIndicationsFor the relief of mild to severe headaches, relief of pain such as headache, toothache, menstrual discomfort, postoperative and rheumatic pain, and for pain and fever associated with colds and flu.Recommended DosageAdults: 1-2 tablets single dose. Adolescents 12-16 years: 1 tablet single dose. If necessary, 3 doses may be taken within 24 hours.ContraindicationHypersensitivity to phenazone, propyphenazone, aminophenazone, metamizol-containing compounds, phenylbutazone-containing products, paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid. Known allergy to caffeine. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Acute hepatic porphyria. Pregnancy, lactation. Infants or children under 12 years.PrecautionImpaired hepatic and renal function. Gilbert's syndrome. Hematopoetic dysfunction. Should not be taken regularly for a prolonged period since it may lead to analgesic nephropathy, irreversible renal insufficiency, chronic headaches. Asthma, chronic rhinitis or chronic urticaria.Drug InteractionHypnotics, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, rifampicin, propanthelin, metoclopramide, chloramphenicol, zidovudine, barbiturates, antihistaminics, benzodiazepines, oral contraceptives, cimetidine, disulfiram, theophylline, ephedrine, smoking, alcohol.Side EffectSkin rash, urticaria, pruritus, erythema, urticaria, angioedema, dyspnea, asthma, anaphylactoid reactions, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, agranulocytosis, pancytopenia.Available FormsTablet x 120's .
SafetyBased on a report from Lareb,[citation needed] a Dutch pharmacovigilance center, it was noted that twenty adverse reactions to Saridon had been reported with no mention of fatal to near fatal cases. There was only mention of one acute life threatening case of stridor withurticaria - which was caused by a non-Saridon product.[clarification needed which product(s)?] The report was concluded by saying that there was no information available of the incidence of anaphylactic reactions to propyphenazone, and that the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) states an incidence of less than 0.01%. The Lareb report suggests the actual incidence to be higher.
Saridon in India

In India, Saridon is made available by Piramal Healthcare Limited. [12] Mostly used by common man to get relief from headache. Saridon is available at INR 16.50 (as of May 2012) per a strip which contains 10 tablets.

The formulation in India consists of 150 mg of propyphenazone, 250 mg of paracetamol and 50 mg of caffeine.  

 

Brufen Tablets

Brufen Tablets

Ibuprofen (INN) (pron.: /abjuprofn/ or /abjuprofn/ eye-bew-proh-fn; fromiso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for pain relief, fever reduction,[1] and swelling.

Ibuprofen has an antiplatelet effect, though relatively mild and somewhat short-lived compared with aspirin or prescription antiplatelet drugs. In general, ibuprofen also acts as a vasoconstrictor. Ibuprofen is a 'core' medicine in the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines necessary to meet the minimum medical needs of a basic healthcare system.[2][3][4][5]

Ibuprofen was derived from propanoic acid by the research arm of Boots Group during the 1960s[6] and patented in 1961. Originally marketed as Brufen, ibuprofen is available under a variety of popular trademarks, including Motrin, Nurofen, Advil, and Nuprin. Generic ("non-branded") Ibruprofen is of exactly the same chemical composition and efficacy at a fraction of the cost; it is widely sold in UK supermarkets under the chain's name [7]
Medical uses

Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.[8] It is also used for pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus.[8]

[edit]Dosage

Ibuprofen has a dose-dependent duration of action of around four to eight hours, which is longer than suggested by its short half-life. The recommended dose varies with body mass and indication. A dose of 400 mg per dose and 1200 mg per day is considered the maximum amount for over-the-counter use,[9] although, under medical direction, the maximum amount for adults is 800 mg per dose or 3200 mg per day based on an individual's response and tolerance.[10]

Unlike aspirin, which breaks down in solution, ibuprofen is stable, thus it can be available intopical gel form, which is absorbed through the skin, and can be used for sports injuries, with less risk of digestive problems.[11]

Ibuprofen lysine

In Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, ibuprofen lysine (the lysine salt of ibuprofen, sometimes called "ibuprofen lysinate" even though the lysine is in cationic form) is licensed for treatment of the same conditions as ibuprofen. The lysine salt increases water solubility, allowing intravenous use, and is indicated for closure of a patent ductus arteriosusin premature infants weighing between 500 and 1,500 grams (1 and 3 lb), who are no more than 32 weeks gestational age when usual medical management (e.g., fluid restriction, diuretics, respiratory support, etc.) is ineffective.[12]

With regard to this indication, ibuprofen lysine is an effective alternative to intravenous indomethacin, and may be advantageous in terms of kidney function.[13] Ibuprofen lysine has been shown to have a more rapid onset of action compared to acid ibuprofen.[14]

 

 

Sennosides Chewable Tablets

Sennosides Chewable Tablets

Brand Name

Ex-Lax Chewable Tablets

Usage

Read the leaflet provided with this medicine carefully. Consult your pharmacist or doctor if you are unable to understand any information.

  • Take Sennosides by mouth with or without food.
  • Take Sennosides with full glass of water (approx. 240 ml).
  • Chew Sennosides tablet or allow it to dissolve in your mouth.
  • While using Sennosides it is recommended to take extra fluids.
  • Best time to take Sennosides Chewable Tablets is at bedtime.
  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Do NOT use this medicine if:

  • You are allergic to any ingredient in Sennosides.
  • You have appendicitis, difficulty swallowing, intestinal blockage, severe constipation, or rectal bleeding.
  • You are having abdominal surgery. Contact your doctor immediately if any of these apply to you.

Important safety information

  • Do not use Sennosides for longer than 1 week or exceed the recommended dose without consulting your doctor. Otherwise there is risk of loss of normal bowel function.
  • If you feel abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or rectal bleeding do not use Sennosides except under the direction of your doctor.
  • If you feel change in bowel habits that lasts for 2 weeks or more, do not use Sennosides. Consult your doctor for detailed information.
  • Do not take additional laxatives with Sennosides unless directed by your doctor.
  • After use of Sennosides if you feel rectal bleeding or failure to have a bowel movement within 12 hours. Stop use and contact doctor immediately.
  • If condition gets worse or does not get better within 1 week, consult your doctor.
  • Urine may be discolored pink to red, or yellow to brown with use of Sennosides.
  • Sennosides should be used with extreme caution in CHILDREN younger than 6 years, as safety and effectiveness have not been confirmed.
  • PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Sennosides while you are pregnant. It is not known if Sennosides is found in breast milk. Do not breast-feeding while you use Sennosides, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby. This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using Sennosides, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist

 

Side Effects

COMMON: Stomach discomfort, cramps, diarrhea, nausea.

 

Severe: Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but SERIOUS side effects occur

  • Severe allergic reactions: rash, hives, itching, difficulty breathing, tightness in the chest, swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue.
  • Poor bowel function
  • Kidney inflammation
  • Rectal bleeding. This is not a complete list of all possible side effects. Contact your healthcare provider or pharmacist to know more.

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