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Arvind Trading Company

Main Mandore Mandi, Jodhpur, Rajasthan

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Cumin Seeds

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Fenugreek Seeds

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Fennel Seeds

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Dill Seeds

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Sesame Seeds

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Black Mustard Seeds

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Arvind Trading Company - Exporter of cumin seeds, fenugreek seeds & fennel seeds in Jodhpur, Rajasthan.

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Cumin Seeds
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Cumin Seeds

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Cumin is native to Egypt and has been cultivated in the Middle East, India, China and Mediterranean countries for millennia. Throughout history, cumin has played an important role as a food and medicine and has been a cultural symbol with varied attributes. Cumin was mentioned in the Bible not only as a seasoning for soup and bread, but also as a currency used to pay tithes to the priests. In ancient Egypt, cumin was not only used as a culinary spice, it was also an ingredient used to mummify pharaohs.
Cumin seeds were highly honored as a culinary seasoning in both ancient Greek and Roman kitchens. Cumin’s popularity was partly due to the fact that its peppery flavor made it a viable replacement for black pepper, which was very expensive and hard to come by. Cumin was also noted for both its medicinal and cosmetic properties. Its application to induce a pallid complexion was frequently employed by many students trying to convince their teachers that they had pulled “all-nighters” studying for their classes. Although a much prized spice, cumin became a symbol of frugality and greed in ancient Rome. Both Marcus Aurelius and Antoninus Pius, emperors with a reputation for their avarice, were given nicknames that included reference to cumin. During the Middle Ages in Europe, cumin was one of the most common spices used. Around that time, cumin added another attribute to its repertoire—it became recognized as a symbol of love and fidelity. People carried cumin in their pockets when attending wedding ceremonies, and married soldiers were sent off to war with a loaf of cumin bread baked by their wives. Cumin’s use for fortifying love is also represented in certain Arabic traditions in which a paste of ground cumin, pepper and honey is thought to have  properties.
Production
  • India
  • Mexico
  • Portugal
  • Spain
  • Turkey
  • China
  • Japan
  • Netherlands
  • France
  • Morocco

Production of cumin in India

  • Rajasthan
  • Gujarat
  • Madhya Pradesh

Uses
this aromatic spice is known for its medicinal properties since ancient times. Being an excellent source of iron, it aids in digestion, boosts the immune system and has anti-carcinogenic properties. Black cumin seeds contain about 100 chemical compounds including vitamins, proteins, carbohydrates, minerals and fatty acids. They are known for their healing qualities. The Islam culture believes that these can heal any type of disease except death while in Bible they are referred to as the curative black seeds. Thus, this spice has a rich history and was particularly favored by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. In ancient times, it was even used as a method for payment of taxes and debts.
New crop
October-November

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Fenugreek Seeds
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Fenugreek Seeds

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Fenugreek is an important and one of the oldest medicinal plants on record. It is native to the Mediterranean, India, China, Northern Africa and the Ukraine, as well as being widely cultivated there. Cultivated commercial products in the United States come mainly from Morocco, Turkey, India and China. The first recorded information dates back to ancient Egypt when it was mentioned as a plant to induce childbirth as well as an embalming agent. Its use spread throughout the Arab world, Greece and India, and then eventually spread to China where it is still used today for abdominal pains, hernia, edema and “cold-damp” conditions.
In the 1800s, it was used in the U.S. as part of an infamous Lydia Pinkham formula called “Vegetable Compound”— for menstrual cramps and for postmenopausal vaginal dryness. It also has a food based tradition, used to supplement wheat and maize flour for making bread, and as a condiment. Historical and theoretical uses abound and the list is long, but a sampling includes: abortifacient, appetite stimulant, baldness, boils, breast enhancement, bronchitis, cellulites, constipation, cough, diarrhea, eczema, flatulence, galactagogue, hepatitis disease, hernia, indigestion, leg ulcers, menopausal symptoms, myalgia, postmenopausal vaginal dryness, hyperglycemia, tuberculosis and wound healing.
Production
  • India
  • Afghanistan
  • Pakistan
  • Iran
  • Nepal
  • Bangladesh
  • Argentina
  • Egypt
  • France
  • Spain
  • Turkey
  • Morocco

Production of fenugreek in India

  • Rajasthan
  • Gujarat
  • Uttarakhand
  • Uttar Pradesh
  • Madhya Pradesh
  • Maharashtra
  • Haryana
  • Punjab

Uses
The leaves and seeds of the fenugreek plant are used as powders and extracts for medicine use. Fenugreek seeds contain 45-60% carbohydrates, most of which is a mucilaginous fiber which is 30% soluble and 20% insoluble fiber. It also contains about 20-30% proteins that are high in lysine and tryptophan, a small amount of oils (5-10%), a small amount of pyridine alkaloids (mostly trigonelline), and a few flavonoids, free amino acids, sapogenins, vitamins and volatile oils. Constituents in fenugreek that are thought to be responsible for its hypoglycemic effects include the testa and endosperm of the defatted seeds called the A subfraction, the 4 hydroxyisoleucine and the fiber. It is also thought that the saponins in the seeds are transformed in the gastrointestinal tract into sapogenins and this is responsible for the lipid lowering effects.
In foods, fenugreek is included as an ingredient in spice blends. It is also used as a flavoring agent in imitation maple syrup, foods, beverages, and tobacco. In manufacturing, fenugreek extracts are used in soaps and cosmetics. Fenugreek leaves are eaten in India as a vegetable.The herb is a characteristic ingredient in some curries and chutneys and the fenugreek extract is used to make imitation maple syrup. Because of its high nutritive contents, it is an important ingredient in vegetable and dhal dishes eaten in India. In India, Young fenugreek plants are used as a pot herb. The leaves are widely used, fresh or dried, in Indian cooking and are often combined with vegetables. Fenugreek seeds are used in a wide range of home-made or commercial curry powders. In northern Africa the plants are used for fodder.
New crop
February-March

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Fennel Seeds
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Fennel Seeds

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As per Greek mythology fennel came from the giant fennel, Ferula Communis, that Bacchanalian God Dionysus (the Greek God of food &  ) & his followers were said to have come from. As per the myths fennel stalk carried the coal that passed down knowledge from the Gods to men at Olympus. It was stalk of fennel plant that Prome-theus used to steal fire from the Gods. The ancient Greeks knew fennel by the name “MARATHON” as it grew in the field in which one of the great ancient battles the “Battle of Marathon” (490 BC) was fought. Ancient Romans regarded Fennel as the herb of sight. Fennel root extracts were often used in tonics to clear cloudy eyes.    Fennel (Feoniculum vulgare) is a perennial plant. It belongs to the “Apiaceae” family of herbs those include anise, caraway, celery, cher-vil, coriander, cumin, dill, and pars-ley. This popular family of culinary herbs are noted for the unique fla-vors they impart to various foods. Fennel has a thick bright green root-stock and stout stems. The 4’ to 5’ feet tall plant has unique beauty about it. The branched leaves bring forth bright golden flowers that blos-som in July & early August with each having thirteen to twenty rays. The leaves, bulb, and stalk of fennel resemble white celery and are all edi-ble. Called the pearl of , recently a popular British concoc-tion of fennel seeds, licorice root and water was named the “tonic for happy lovers”.
  

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Dill Seeds
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Dill Seeds

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Anethum graveolens is believed to have its beginnings in the Mediterranean region. The plant has a long and ancient history in many countries as a culinary and medicinal herb. The earliest known record of dill as a medicinal herb was found in Egypt 5,000 years ago, when the plant was referred to as a “soothing medicine.” Around 3,000 B.C.E. the Babylonians were known to have grown dill in their gardens. Dill was also a widely used and familiar plant in the Greek culture. Dill scented oil was burned in Greek homes, and the plant’s essential oil was used to make some of their wine. Dioscorides, a Greek doctor and surgeon, wrote that scorched dill seedswere used to aid with healing wounded soldiers, a practice which was also shared by the Romans. Gladiators were fed meals covered with dillbecause it was hoped that the herb would grant them valor and courage. Dill seeds are often called “meetinghouse seeds” because they were chewed during long church services to keep members awake or kids quiet. The seeds were also chewed in order to freshen the breath and quiet noisy stomachs. A. graveolens has long been a highly prized herb, and in many cultures it was taxed or tithed. During the seventeenth century, dill became a popular herb in England and it could be found in many “hortus,” or kitchen gardens. The plant most likely arrived in Americaby means of the early settlers.
Production
  • India
  • Pakistan
  • Egypt
  • Fiji
  • Mexico
  • Netherland
  • United States
  • England
  • Hungary
Uses:-
It has also been used as a magic weapon and a medicine. During the Middle Ages, people used dill to defend against witchcraft and enchantments. In India, however, dried dill fruits are occasionally used to flavor the lentil and bean dishes known as dal. More recently, people have used dill seeds and the partsc of the plant that grow above the ground as medicine. Dill is used for digestion problems including loss of appetite, intestinal gas (flatulence), liver problems, and gallbladder complaints. It is also used for urinary tract disorders including kidney disease and painful or difficult urination. Other uses for dill include treatment of fever and colds, cough, bronchitis, hemorrhoids, infections, spasms, nerve pain, genital ulcers, menstrual cramps, and sleep disorders. Dill seed is sometimes applied to the mouth and throat for pain and swelling (inflammation).     In foods, dill is used as a culinary spice. Dill oil is used as a fragrance in cosmetics, soaps, and perfumes. Dill Seeds are widely used in picking as well as in German, Russian, and Scandinavian dishes. Dill Seed is good sprinkled over casseroles and in salad dressing. It has a camphorous, slightly bitter flavor. In Europe, it is mostly used for bread, vegetables (especially cucumber), pickles and fish; for the last application, the leaves are preferred. Furthermore, it is indispensable for herb flavored vinegars. Dill is also one of the few herbs used in cooking of the Baltic states, where chopped dill is a frequently decoration on various foods similar to the parsley and chives in other European countries. Fresh dill leaves (dill weed)is a kind of “national spice” in Scandinavian countries, where fish or shelfish dishes are usually either directly flavored with dill or served together with sauces containing dill. German cook also tend to use dill mostly for fish soups and stews.

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Sesame Seeds
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Sesame Seeds

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Sesame is an integral part of ancient legends. Sesame (Sesamum indicum) has early origins in East Africa and in India. It is perhaps one of the oldest crops cultivated by man, having been grown in the near east and Africa for over 5,000 years for cooking and medicinal needs. The ancients attributed near-mystical powers to sesame. The oil was used in barter since it would preserve and store in the desert for years.
Production
   Today, world production is estimated to be over 15 million acres (6.2 million hectares) and over 57% of the world production is in Asia. Most of the Asian production is in India, China, and Burma (Myanmar). In Asia most sesame is consumed within 100 miles of where it is grown since farmers grow very small plots for their extended families. Africa grows 15% of the world’s sesame, with Sudan, Uganda, and Nigeria being key producers.
Top producing countries are: –
  • India
  • China
  • Myanmar
  • Sudan
  • Uganda

Production of Sesame in India

  • Uttar Pradesh
  • Madhya Pradesh
  • Rajasthan
  • Gujarat
  • Maharastra
  • Jharkahnd
  • Haryana

Uses:-
   Sesame seed is processed and utilized in numerous ways. In most areas of the world, sesame is produced for its cooking oil and other direct food uses, with some direct consumption of the seed. In the U.S. sesame seed is primarily used as a confectionary topping, in baked goods, or as a condiment. Seed color is genetically controlled and light-colored seed is preferred for these confectionery uses. Sesame seed imparts unique taste and textural features when included with baked products. Sesame is rich in calcium and high in antioxidants and other healthful features. Imported seed is usually de-hulled before shipment where hand labor is involved in removing extraneous matter. Imported seed is brokered by firms for the processing firms who produce baked or confectionary products. The oil from seed is used in manufacture of soaps, paints, perfumes, pharmaceuticals and insecticides.

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Black Mustard Seeds
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Black Mustard Seeds

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In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, the mustard seed is used by Jesus in the parable of the Mustard Seed as a model for the kingdom of God which initially starts small but grows to be the biggest of all garden plants. The earliest reference to mustard is in India from a story of Gautama Buddha in the 5th century BCE. Gautama Buddha told the story of the grieving mother (Kisa Gotami) and the mustard seed.
Regional usage
Mohari (Marathi ), Aavalu (Telugu lu), kadugu (Tamil ), or sasive (Kannada), “Kadugu” (Malayalam ) variety of Indian pickle consisting mainly of mangoes, red chilli powder and aavaa pindi (powdered mustard seed) preserved in mustard oil, is popular in Southern India with its origin in Andhra Pradesh. These mustard seeds are known in Hindi/Urdu as sarson (indian colza, Brassica rapa subsp. trilocularis, syn. Brassica campestris var. sarson)[5] and in Punjabi as sarron.
Production
  • India
  • Canada
  • Nepal
  • Myanmar
  • Russia
  • Ukraine
  • China
  • United States
  • France
  • Czech Republic
  • Germany

Production of Mustard in India

  • Rajasthan
  • Uttar-Pradesh
  • Haryana
  • Gujarat
  • West Bengal
  • Assam
  • Madhya Pradesh
Uses
These are used as a spice in Northern India and Nepal. The seeds are usually roasted until they pop. They are also planted to grow saag (greens) which are stir-fried and eaten as a vegetable preparation, sarson ka saag (sarron da saag in Punjabi). In Maharastra, it is called as mohari, and is used frequently in Maharanee’s recipes. Sarson ka tel (mustard oil) is used for body massage during extreme winters, as it is assumed to keep the body warm and moist.
Cultivation
Mustard seeds generally take three to ten days to germinate if placed under the proper conditions, which include a cold atmosphere and relatively moist soil. Mustard grows well in temperate regions. Major producers of mustard seeds include Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, India, Pakistan and the United States. Brown and black mustard seeds return higher yields than their yellow counterparts. In Pakistan, rapeseed-mustard is the second most important source of oil, after cotton. It is cultivated over an area of 307,000 hectares with annual production of 233,000 tonnes and contributes about 17% to the domestic production of edible oil. Mustard seed is a rich source of oil and protein. The seed has oil as high as 46-48%, whole seed meal has 43.6 % protein.

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Yellow Mustard Seeds
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Yellow Mustard Seeds

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In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, the mustard seed is used by Jesus in the parable of the Mustard Seed as a model for the kingdom of God which initially starts small but grows to be the biggest of all garden plants. The earliest reference to mustard is in India from a story of Gautama Buddha in the 5th century BCE. Gautama Buddha told the story of the grieving mother (Kisa Gotami) and the mustard seed.
Regional usage
Mohari (Marathi ), Aavalu (Telugu lu), kadugu (Tamil ), or sasive (Kannada), “Kadugu” (Malayalam ) variety of Indian pickle consisting mainly of mangoes, red chilli powder and aavaa pindi (powdered mustard seed) preserved in mustard oil, is popular in Southern India with its origin in Andhra Pradesh. These mustard seeds are known in Hindi/Urdu as sarson (indian colza, Brassica rapa subsp. trilocularis, syn. Brassica campestris var. sarson)[5] and in Punjabi as sarron.
Production
  • India
  • Canada
  • Nepal
  • Myanmar
  • Russia
  • Ukraine
  • China
  • United States
  • France
  • Czech Republic
  • Germany

Production of Mustard in India

  • Rajasthan
  • Punjab
  • Haryana
  • Gujarat
  • West Bengal
  • Assam
  • Madhya Pradesh
Uses
These are used as a spice in Northern India and Nepal. The seeds are usually roasted until they pop. They are also planted to grow saag (greens) which are stir-fried and eaten as a vegetable preparation, sarson ka saag (sarron da saag in Punjabi). In Maharastra, it is called as mohari, and is used frequently in Maharanee’s recipes. Sarson ka tel (mustard oil) is used for body massage during extreme winters, as it is assumed to keep the body warm and moist.
Cultivation
Mustard seeds generally take three to ten days to germinate if placed under the proper conditions, which include a cold atmosphere and relatively moist soil. Mustard grows well in temperate regions. Major producers of mustard seeds include Canada, Hungary, Great Britain, India, Pakistan and the United States. Brown and black mustard seeds return higher yields than their yellow counterparts. In Pakistan, rapeseed-mustard is the second most important source of oil, after cotton. It is cultivated over an area of 307,000 hectares with annual production of 233,000 tonnes and contributes about 17% to the domestic production of edible oil. Mustard seed is a rich source of oil and protein. The seed has oil as high as 46-48%, whole seed meal has 43.6 % protein.

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Groundnut Kernels
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Groundnut Kernels

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The cultivated groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), originated in South America (Bolivia and adjoining countries) and is now grown throughout the tropical and warm temperate regions of the world. This crop was grown widely by native people of the New World at the time of European expansion in the sixteenth century and was subsequently taken to Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Groundnut was introduced to the present south-eastern United States during colonial times. Groundnuts were grown primarily as a garden crop in the United States until 1870.    As a field crop, the crop was frequently used for pig pasture until about 1930. In South Africa, groundnuts are grown in the summer rainfall regions under irrigated or rainfed conditions. Resource limited farmers, especially in the northern and eastern parts of South Africa, grow groundnuts mainly for their own consumption. Groundnuts are an important source of nutrition in the northern KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga areas.
Climatic requirements
Groundnuts require a high temperature and a frost-free period of about 160 days. They will not reach optimum maturity for a marketable yield to justify commercial production in areas with fewer heat units during the growing season. They are very sensitive to low temperatures and seeds should only be planted when the minimum temperature stabilizes above 18 °C. Moisture is another critical factor for successful groundnut production. Planting must be done on moist warm soils to speed-up the germination process. Rainfall in the region of 500 to 700 mm per annum will be satisfactory for good yields of groundnuts. Groundnuts grow best in well-drained, red-colored, yellow-red and red, fertile, sandy to sandy loam soils with a pH range of 5, 5 to 7, 0. Saline soils are not suitable because groundnuts have a very low salt tolerance.
Production
  • China
  • India
  • Nigeria
  • United States
  • Myanmar

Production of Groundnuts in India

  • Andhra Pradesh
  • Tamil Nadu
  • Gujarat
  • Karnataka
  • Maharashtra
  • Rajasthan
Uses
Seeds yield non-drying, edible oil, used in cooking, margarines, salads, canning, and deep-frying; the oil content of the groundnut kernels is between 45% and 55%. Groundnut oil contains high levels of energy, fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and essential fatty acids. Seeds can be eaten raw or boiled and roasted for immediate consumption. They can be chopped into confectioneries, or ground into peanut butter. Groundnuts are also used for sweets (brittle). Young pods may be consumed as a vegetable. Young leaves and tips are suitable as a cooked green vegetable. Other products include ice cream, massage oil and peanut milk. Groundnut oil can be used in various ways at different levels within the industry. A raw material for manufacturing pharmaceuticals, soaps, hair creams, cosmetics, dyes, paints, lubricants; emulsions for insect control and fuel for diesel engines. It can also be used to produce a fluid diet used to strengthen patients physically and sharpen their appetites before and after operations. The hulls are used for furfural and as filler for fertilizers.

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