X

Vishnu Kanti Clinic

Paras Hmri Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra

| Verified Supplier

View Mobile Number
Hi
I agree to the terms and privacy policy
Verifying...
1

Have a requirement?
Get Best Price

Hi
I agree to the terms and privacy policy
Verifying...
1

Have a requirement?
Get Best Price

Vishnu Kanti Clinic - Nursing Homes / Clinics / Hospitals of inpatient chemotherapy services, palliative chemotherapy services & bone marrow transplant services in Pune, Maharashtra.

Nature of Business

Nursing Homes / Clinics / Hospitals

Inpatient Chemotherapy Services
Interested in this product?
Get Best Quote

Chemotherapy (often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a category of cancer treatment that uses chemical substances, especially one or more anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapeutic agents) that are given as part of a standardized chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy may be given with a curative intent, or it may aim to prolong life or to reduce symptoms (palliative chemotherapy). Along with hormonal therapy and targeted therapy, it is one of the major categories of medical oncology (pharmacotherapy for cancer). These modalities are often used in conjunction with other cancer treatments, such as radiation therapy, surgery, and/or hyperthermia therapy. Some chemotherapy drugs are also used to treat other conditions, including AL amyloidosis, ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and scleroderma.

Traditional chemotherapeutic agents are cytotoxic, that is to say they act by killing cells that divide rapidly, one of the main properties of most cancer cells. This means that chemotherapy also harms cells that divide rapidly under normal circumstances: cells in the bone marrow, digestive tract, and hair follicles. This results in the most common side-effects of chemotherapy: myelosuppression (decreased production of blood cells, hence also immunosuppression), mucositis (inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract), and alopecia (hair loss).

Some newer anticancer drugs (for example, various monoclonal antibodies) are not indiscriminately cytotoxic, but rather target proteins that are abnormally expressed in cancer cells and that are essential for their growth. Such treatments are often referred to as targeted therapy (as distinct from classic chemotherapy) and are often used alongside traditional chemotherapeutic agents in antineoplastic treatment regimens.

hemotherapy may use one drug at a time (single-agent chemotherapy) or several drugs at once (combination chemotherapy or polychemotherapy). The combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is chemoradiotherapy. Chemotherapy using drugs that convert to cytotoxic activity only upon light exposure is called photochemotherapy or photodynamic therapy

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Palliative Chemotherapy Services
Interested in this product?
Get Best Quote

Palliative care is a rapidly growing subspecialty of medicine entailing expert and active assessment, evaluation and treatment of the physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs of patients and families with serious illnesses. It provides an added layer of support to the patient's regular medical care. As cancer is detected earlier and its treatments improve, palliative care is increasingly playing a vital role in the oncology population. Because of these advances in oncology, the role of palliative care services for such patients is actively evolving. Herein, we will highlight emerging paradigms in palliative care and attempt to delineate key education, research and policy areas that lie ahead for the field of palliative oncology. Despite the critical need for improving multi-faceted and multi-specialty symptom management and patient–physician communication, we will focus on the interface between palliative care and oncology specialists, a relationship that can lead to better overall patient care on all of these levels.

Oncologists hold different notions and continue to receive mixed messages regarding the scope of palliative care. This phenomenon reflects a rapidly changing healthcare landscape, necessitating continual palliative care education and provider self-assessment in order to deliver the highest quality care to patients with serious illnesses.

At its origins, palliative care was defined in 1990, by the World Health Organization (WHO) as ‘the active total care of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatments’ [1]. While the definition further stated that ‘many aspects of palliative care are also applicable earlier in the course of the illness’, palliative care was initially conceptualized as a specialty to care for end-stage and dying cancer patients. Over the past two decades, in response to the needs of patients living with serious illness for multiple years, the transformation of many cancers into chronic diseases through treatment advances, and the recognition that patients cannot be segmented into those who are living and those who are dying, the definition and role palliative care has evolved and changed

Indeed, in 2012, palliative care is defined as specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. This type of care is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness, whatever the diagnosis. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work with a patient's other doctors to provide an extra layer of support. This current definition is notable for its lack of any mention of ‘cure’. While patients receiving palliative care can transition into hospice and end-of-life care, the goal of palliative care is to optimize quality of life while living with a serious illness. Palliative care is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness, and can be provided together with curative treatment [2]. Recent perspectives from leaders in oncology and palliative care agree with this notion of co-management, regardless of curabilit

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Treatment Services

Treatment Services

Get Latest Price

Ask for Details

Building Construction Service
Ask for Details

Hospital

Hospital

Get Latest Price

Ask for Details

Bone Marrow Transplant Services
Interested in this product?
Get Best Quote

Bone marrow is the flexible tissue in the interior of bones. In humans, red blood cells are produced by cores of bone marrow in the heads of long bones in a process known as hematopoiesis. On average, bone marrow constitutes 4% of the total body mass of humans; in an adult weighing 65 kilograms (143 lb), bone marrow typically accounts for approximately 2.6 kilograms (5.7 lb). The hematopoietic component of bone marrow produces approximately 500 billion blood cells per day, which use the bone marrow vasculature as a conduit to the body's systemic circulation. Bone marrow is also a key component of the lymphatic system, producing the lymphocytes that support the body's immune system.[2]

Bone marrow transplants can be conducted to treat severe diseases of the bone marrow, including certain forms of cancer such as leukemia. Additionally, bone marrow stem cells have been successfully transformed into functional neural cells,[3] and can also potentially be used to treat illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease.

The two types of bone marrow are "red marrow" (Latin: medulla ossium rubra), which consists mainly of hematopoietic tissue, and "yellow marrow" (Latin: medulla ossium flava), which is mainly made up of fat cells. Red blood cells, platelets, and most white blood cells arise in red marrow. Both types of bone marrow contain numerous blood vessels and capillaries. At birth, all bone marrow is red. With age, more and more of it is converted to the yellow type; only around half of adult bone marrow is red. Red marrow is found mainly in the flat bones, such as the pelvis, sternum, cranium, ribs, vertebrae and scapulae, and in the cancellous ("spongy") material at the epiphyseal ends of long bones such as the femur and humerus. Yellow marrow is found in the medullary cavity, the hollow interior of the middle portion of long bones. In cases of severe blood loss, the body can convert yellow marrow back to red marrow to increase blood cell production.

The stroma of the bone marrow is all tissue not directly involved in the marrow's primary function of hematopoiesis. Yellow bone marrow makes up the majority of bone marrow stroma, in addition to smaller concentrations of stromal cells located in the red bone marrow. Though not as active as parenchymal red marrow, stroma is indirectly involved in hematopoiesis, since it provides the hematopoietic microenvironment that facilitates hematopoiesis by the parenchymal cells. For instance, they generate colony stimulating factors, which have a significant effect on hematopoiesis. Cell types that constitute the bone marrow stroma include:

View Complete Details

Yes, I am interested!

Get Price & Details

Get Price & Details

Get in touch with us

Reach Us

Vishnu Kanti ClinicNh 30 Raza Baiely, Road Raja Bazar, Paras Hmri Hospital, Pune-800014, Maharashtra, India

Dr. Shreeniwas S. Raut (Owner)

View Mobile Number

Send SMS
Send Email
Leave a Message, we will call you back!
Send your enquiry to this supplier
I agree to the terms and privacy policy
Tell us what you need, and we’ll help you get quotes
Tell us what you
need
Receive seller
details
Seal the deal
Pay with IndiaMART
Tell us what you need, and we’ll help you get quotes
I agree to the terms and privacy policy