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Raw And Whole Spices

Providing you the best range of Cotton Seed Oil, Pomegranate Seed, Star Anise, Black Cardamom, Kala Zeera Black Cumin and Jaiphal Nutmeg with effective & timely delivery.

Cotton Seed Oil
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Cotton Seed Oil

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Product Code: Cotton Seed oil
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  • Cottonseed oil is a cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plant of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium herbaceum. All cotton that is grown is used to produce cotton fiber, animal feed, and oil.[1] In 2011 cotton was the third biggest of the genetically modified crops grown worldwide, as measured by acreage: soybean was 47%, occupying 75.4 million hectares; biotech maize (51.00 million hectares at 32%), biotech cotton (24.7 million hectares at 15%) and biotech canola (8.2 million hectares at 5%) [2]
  • Cotton seed has a similar structure to other oilseeds such as sunflower seed, having an oil-bearing kernel surrounded by a hard outer hull; in processing, the oil is extracted from the kernel. Cottonseed oil is used for salad oil, mayonnaise, salad dressing, and similar products because of its flavor stability.

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Pomegranate Seed
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Pomegranate Seed

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Brand: Horlicks
Product Code: Pomegranate seed
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  • The pomegranate has been mentioned in many ancient texts, notably the Book of Exodus, the Homeric Hymns and the Quran. In recent years, it has become more common in the commercial markets of North America and the Western Hemisphere.
  • Pomegranates are used in cooking, baking, juices, smoothies and alcoholic beverages, such as martinis and wine.

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Star Anise
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Star Anise

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Brand: Horlicks
Product Code: Star anise
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Star anise contains anethole, the same ingredient that gives the unrelated anise its flavor. Recently, star anise has come into use in the West as a less expensive substitute for anise in baking as well as in liquor production, most distinctively in the production of the liquor Galliano. It is also used in the production of sambuca, pastis, and many types of absinthe. Star anise enhances the flavour of meat. It is used as a spice in preparation of biryani and masala chai all over the Indian subcontinent. It is widely used in Chinese cuisine, and in Indian cuisine where it is a major component of garam masala, and in Malay and Indonesian cuisine. It is widely grown for commercial use in China, India, and most other countries in Asia. Star anise is an ingredient of the traditional five-spice powder of Chinese cooking. It is also a major ingredient in the making of ph, a Vietnamese noodle soup.


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Black Cardamom
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Black Cardamom

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Product Code: Black cardamom
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Kala Zeera Black Cumin
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Kala Zeera Black Cumin

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Product Code: Black cumin
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Jaiphal Nutmeg
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Jaiphal Nutmeg

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Product Code: Nutmeg
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  • The nutmeg tree is any of several species of trees in genus Myristica. The most important commercial species is Myristica fragrans, an evergreen tree indigenous to the Banda Islands in the Moluccas (or Spice Islands) of Indonesia. The nutmeg tree is important for two spices derived from the fruit: nutmeg and mace.[1]
  • Nutmeg is the seed of the tree, roughly egg-shaped and about 20 to 30 mm (0.8 to 1.2 in) long and 15 to 18 mm (0.6 to 0.7 in) wide, and weighing between 5 and 10 g (0.2 and 0.4 oz) dried, while mace is the dried "lacy" reddish covering or aril of the seed.
  • The first harvest of nutmeg trees takes place 7–9 years after planting, and the trees reach full production after 20 years. Nutmeg is usually used in powdered form.
  • This is the only tropical fruit that is the source of two different spices. Several other commercial products are also produced from the trees, including essential oils, extracted oleoresins, and nutmeg butter (see below).
  • The common or fragrant nutmeg, Myristica fragrans, native to the Banda Islands of Indonesia, is also grown in Penang Island in Malaysia and the Caribbean, especially in Grenada. It also grows in Kerala, a state in southern India. Other species of nutmeg include Papuan nutmeg M. argentea from New Guinea, and M. malabarica from India.

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Tej Patta
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Tej Patta

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Product Code: Indian bay leaf, bay leaf
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  • Cinnamomum tamala, (Malayalam: , Hindi: Tej Patta or Indian bay leaf, also known as tejpat,[2] Malabar leaf, Indian bark,[2] Indian cassia,[2] or malabathrum is a tree within the Lauraceae family which is native to India, Nepal, Bhutan, and China.[2] It has aromatic leaves which are used for culinary and medicinal purposes. It is thought to have been one of the major sources of the medicinal plant leaves known in classic and medieval times as malabathrum (or malobathrum).
  • The leaves, known as tejpat in Nepali, tejapatta or tejpatta in Hindi, Tejpat in Assamese and tamalpatra  in Marathi and in original Sanskrit, are used extensively in the cuisines of India, Nepal, and Bhutan, particularly in the Moghul cuisine of North India and Nepal and in Tsheringma herbal tea in Bhutan. It is called Biryani Aaku or Bagharakku in Telugu.
  • They are often labeled as "Indian bay leaves," or just "bay leaf", causing confusion with the leaf from the bay laurel, a tree of Mediterranean origin in a different genus, and the appearance and aroma of the two are quite different.
  • This may lead to confusion when following Indian or Pakistani recipes. Bay laurel leaves are shorter and light to medium green in color, with one large vein down the length of the leaf, while tejpat are about twice as long and wider, usually olive green in color, and with three veins down the length of the leaf.
  • True tejpat leaves impart a strong cassia- or cinnamon-like aroma to dishes, while the bay laurel leaf's aroma is more reminiscent of pine and lemon. Indian grocery stores usually carry true tejpat leaves. Some grocers may only offer Turkish bay leaves,[clarification needed] in regions where true tejpat is unavailable.

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Gur Jaggery
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Gur Jaggery

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Product Code: Gur Jaggery
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  • Jaggery (also transliterated as jaggeree) is a traditional unrefined, uncentrifuged whole cane sugar consumed in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean.[1] It is a concentrated product of cane juice or date juice without separation of the molasses and crystals, and can vary from golden brown to dark brown in color.[1] It contains up to 50% sucrose, up to 20% invert sugars, up to 20% moisture, and the remainder made up of other insoluble matter, such as wood ash, proteins, and bagasse fibers.
  •  It was originally created as an easier way to transport sugar. In Venezuela, it is an essential ingredient for many typical recipes, and in some parts of the country, it is used in place of refined sugar as a more accessible, cheaper and healthier sweetener. Jaggery is mixed with other ingredients, such as peanuts, condensed milk, coconut, and white sugar, to produce several locally marketed and consumed delicacies.
  • Jaggery is made of the products of both sugarcane and the date palm tree. The sugar made from the sap of the date palm is both more prized and less commonly available outside of the regions where it is made.
  • The coconut palm is also tapped for producing jaggery in West Bengal, South India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, syrup extracts from kithul (Caryota urens) trees are widely used for jaggery production. This is considered the best quality jaggery available in local market and is given a higher value than jaggery from other sources.
  • All types of the sugar come in blocks or pastes of solidified concentrated sugar syrup heated to 200°C. Traditionally, the syrup is made by boiling raw sugarcane juice or palm sap in large, shallow, round-bottom vessels.

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Nimbu Lemon / Lime
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Nimbu Lemon / Lime

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Product Code: Nimbu
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  • The lemon (Citrus × limon) is a small evergreen tree native to Asia, and the tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit. The fruit's juice, pulp and peel, especially the zest, are used as foods. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade.
  • The origin of the lemon is a mystery, though it is thought that lemons first grew in Southern India, northern Burma, and China.[1][2] A study of the genetic origin of the lemon reported that it is a hybrid between sour orange and citron.[3]
  • Lemons were known to the Jews of Jerusalem, who, according to Josephus, pelted an errant high priest with them during a festival in the 90s BC,[4] although Jewish tradition maintains that this was done with citrons, not lemons.
  • They entered Europe near southern Italy no later than the 1st century AD, during the time of Ancient Rome.
  • However, they were not widely cultivated. They were later introduced to Persia and then to Iraq and Egypt around 700 AD. The lemon was first recorded in literature in a 10th century Arabic treatise on farming, and was also used as an ornamental plant in early Islamic gardens.[1][2] It was distributed widely throughout the Arab world and the Mediterranean region between 1000 and 1150.
  • The first substantial cultivation of lemons in Europe began in Genoa in the middle of the 15th century.[2] The lemon was later introduced to the Americas in 1493 when Christopher Columbus brought lemon seeds to Hispaniola on his voyages. Spanish conquest throughout the New World helped spread lemon seeds. It was mainly used as an ornamental plant and for medicine.[2] In the 19th century, lemons were increasingly planted in Florida and California

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Salt
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Salt

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Product Code: Namak / Salt
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  • Salt, also known as rock salt (halite), is a crystalline mineral that is composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of ionic salts. It is absolutely essential for animal life, but can be harmful to animals and plants in excess.
  • Salt is one of the oldest, most ubiquitous food seasonings and salting is an important method of food preservation. The taste of salt (saltiness) is one of the basic human tastes.
  • Salt for human consumption is produced in different forms: unrefined salt (such as sea salt), refined salt (table salt), and iodized salt. It is a crystalline solid, white, pale pink or light gray in color, normally obtained from sea water or rock deposits. Edible rock salts may be slightly grayish in color because of mineral content.
  • Chloride and sodium ions, the two major components of salt, are needed by all known living creatures in small quantities. Salt is involved in regulating the water content (fluid balance) of the body.
  • The sodium ion itself is used for electrical signaling in the nervous system.[1] Because of its importance to survival, salt has often been considered a valuable commodity during human history. However, as salt consumption has increased during modern times, scientists have become aware of the health risks associated with high salt intake, including high blood pressure in sensitive individuals.
  • Therefore, some health authorities have recommended limitations of dietary sodium, although others state the risk is minimal for typical western diets.The United States Department of Health and Human Services recommends that individuals consume no more than 1500–2300 mg of sodium (3750–5750 mg of salt) per day depending on age.

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Methi Seeds/ Fenugreek Seed
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Product Code: Fenugreek seed
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Fenugreek has three culinary uses: as a herb (dried or fresh leaves), as a spice (seeds), and as a vegetable (fresh leaves, sprouts, and microgreens). Sotolon is the chemical responsible for fenugreek's distinctive sweet smell.
  • The distinctive cuboid-shaped, yellow-to-amber coloured fenugreek seeds are frequently encountered in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent. The seeds are used in the preparation of pickles, vegetable dishes, daals, and spice mixes, such as panch phoron and sambar powder. Fenugreek seeds are used both whole and in powdered form and are often roasted to reduce their bitterness and enhance their flavor.[5]
  • Fenugreek is also used as a vegetable. Fresh fenugreek leaves are an ingredient in some Indian curries.
  • The sprouted seeds and microgreens are used in salads. When harvested as microgreens, fenugreek is known as Samudra Methi in Maharashtra, especially in and around Mumbai, where it is often grown near the sea in the sandy tracts, hence the name (Samudra, which means "ocean" in Sanskrit).
  • Samudra Methi is also grown in dry river beds in the Gangetic plains. When sold as a vegetable in India, the young plants are harvested with their roots still attached. Any remaining soil is washed off and they are then sold in small bundles in the markets and bazaars to extend their shelf life.
  • In Persian cuisine, fenugreek leaves are used and called (shanbalile). It is the key ingredient and one of several greens incorporated into ghormeh sabzi and Eshkeneh, often said to be the Iranian national dishes.
  • Fenugreek is used in Eritrean and Ethiopian cuisine.[7] The word for fenugreek in Amharic is abesh (or abish), and the seed is used in Ethiopia as a natural herbal medicine in the treatment of diabetes.

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Methi Leaves / Fenugreek Leaf
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Product Code: Fenugreek leaf
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Fenugreek has three culinary uses: as a herb (dried or fresh leaves), as a spice (seeds), and as a vegetable (fresh leaves, sprouts, and microgreens). Sotolon is the chemical responsible for fenugreek's distinctive sweet smell.

  • The distinctive cuboid-shaped, yellow-to-amber coloured fenugreek seeds are frequently encountered in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent. The seeds are used in the preparation of pickles, vegetable dishes, daals, and spice mixes, such as panch phoron and sambar powder.
  • Fenugreek seeds are used both whole and in powdered form and are often roasted to reduce their bitterness and enhance their flavor.
  • Fenugreek is also used as a vegetable. Fresh fenugreek leaves are an ingredient in some Indian curries.
  • The sprouted seeds and microgreens are used in salads. When harvested as microgreens, fenugreek is known as Samudra Methi in Maharashtra, especially in and around Mumbai, where it is often grown near the sea in the sandy tracts, hence the name (Samudra, which means "ocean" in Sanskrit).

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Kudampuli  Garcinia Gummi-gutta
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  • Product Code: Kudampuli
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Gambooge is grown for its fruit in southeast Asia, and west and central Africa. It thrives in moist forests.

Gambooge is one of several closely related Garcinia species from the plant family Guttiferae.[1] With thin skin and deep vertical lobes, the fruit of G. cambogia and related species range from about the size of an orange to that of a grapefruit; G. cambogia looks more like a small yellowish, greenish or sometimes reddish pumpkin.[2] The color can vary considerably. When the rinds are dried and cured in preparation for storage and extraction, they are dark brown or black in color.

Along the west coast of South India, G. cambogia is popularly termed "Malabar Tamarind," which is actually a quite different species (Tamarindis indica). The latter is a small and the former a quite large evergreen tree. The two have the same culinary uses. G. cambogia is also called "Goraka" or, in some areas, simply "Kattcha puli" (souring fruit).

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Kesar Mari Mari / Saffron Pulp
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  • Product Code: Kesar mar
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Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the saffron crocus. Crocus is a genus in the family Iridaceae. Each saffron crocus grows to 20–30 cm (8–12 in) and bears up to four flowers, each with three vivid crimson stigmas, which are each the distal end of a carpel.[2] Together with the styles, or stalks that connect the stigmas to their host plant, the dried stigmas are used mainly in various cuisines as a seasoning and colouring agent. Saffron, long among the world's most costly spices by weight,[3][4] is native to Greece or Southwest Asia[5][4] and was first cultivated in Greece.[6] As a genetically monomorphic clone,[7] it was slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.

The saffron crocus, unknown in the wild, likely descends from Crocus cartwrightianus, which originated in Crete;[7] C. thomasii and C. pallasii are other possible precursors.[8][9] The saffron crocus is a triploid that is "self-incompatible" and male sterile; it undergoes aberrant meiosis and is hence incapable of independent reproduction—all propagation is by vegetative multiplication via manual "divide-and-set" of a starter clone or by interspecific hybridisation.[10][9] If C. sativus is a mutant form of C. cartwrightianus, then it may have emerged via plant breeding, which would have selected for elongated stigmas, in late Bronze-Age Crete.

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