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Complex Trauma Care

Providing you the best range of Complex Femoral Fractures, Arthroscopy Surgery, Osteoporosis Care, Complex Periarticular Injuries, Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures and Fractures In Children, Adults, And The Elderly with effective & timely delivery.

Complex Femoral Fractures
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LocationAurangabad
GenderAny
Age GroupAll
UsageFor the treatment of multiple fractures to the femur bone
Treatment Type Allopathic
TypeSurgery

The femur is one of the largest and strongest bones in the body. The femur is the thigh bone which extends from the hip joint down to the knee joint. Because the femur is such a strong bone, it can take tremendous force to cause a fracture of the femur.Femoral stress fractureA femur stress fracture is the result of cyclic overloading of the bone or a dramatic increase in the muscular forces across their insertion, causing microfracture. These repetitive stresses overcome the ability of the bone to heal the microtrauma. The area most susceptible to stress fracture is the medial junction of the proximal and middle third of the femur, which occurs as a result of the compression forces on the medial femur. Stress fractures can also occur on the lateral aspect of the femoral neck in areas of distraction and are less likely to heal non-operatively than compression-side stress fractures. Stress fractures occur most often in repetitive overload sports such as in runners and in baseball and basketball players.

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Arthroscopy Surgery
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Arthroscopy Surgery

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LocationAurangabad
Treatment TypeAllopathic
Type of SurgeryArthroscopy
UsageFor the diagnosis and treatment of deformities and damages to the joints
GenderAny
Age GroupAll

Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic surgery) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage of the interior of a joint is performed using an arthroscope, a type of endoscope that is inserted into the joint through a small incision. Arthroscopic procedures can be performed either to evaluate or to treat many orthopedic conditions including torn floating cartilage, torn surface cartilage, ACL reconstruction, and trimming damaged cartilage.Types of Arthroscopic SurgeryArthroscopic surgery could potentially be performed on any joint, and as time passes, more and more different joints are being arthroscopically treated. Common types of arthroscopic surgery include:Knee ArthroscopyShoulder ArthroscopyHip ArthroscopyAnkle ArthroscopyElbow ArthroscopyWrist ArthroscopyKnee and shoulder arthroscopy are by far the most common arthroscopic procedures performed. These joints are large enough to manipulate the instruments around, and they are amenable to arthroscopic surgery treatments. Technically speaking, any joint can be arthroscoped. However, the practicality and the instrumentation available limit our ability to arthroscope every joint for all types of problems. The most common arthroscopic procedures include repairing cartilage and meniscus problems in the knee, and repairing rotator cuff tears in the shoulder.

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Osteoporosis Care
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Osteoporosis Care

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Osteoporosis is the thinning of bone tissue and loss of bone density over time. It is the most common type of bone disease.
 Causes and risk factors of OsteoporosisOsteoporosis occurs when the body fails to form enough new bone, when too much old bone is reabsorbed by the body, or both. Calcium and phosphate are two minerals that are essential for normal bone formation. Throughout youth, your body uses these minerals to produce bones. If you do not get enough calcium, or if your body does not absorb enough calcium from the diet, bone production and bone tissues may suffer. Other causes of osteoporosis include:Being confined to a bedChronic rheumatoid arthritis, chronic kidney disease, eating disordersTaking corticosteroid medications (prednisone, methylprednisolone) every day for more than 3 months, or taking some antiseizure drugsHyperparathyroidismVitamin D deficiencyWhite women, especially those with a family history of osteoporosis, have a greater than average risk of developing osteoporosis.Other risk factors of osteoporosis include:Drinking a large amount of alcoholFamily history of osteoporosisHistory of hormone treatment for prostate cancer or breast cancerLow body weightSmokingToo little calcium in the diet

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Complex Periarticular Injuries
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Periarticular problems, particularly those involving the rotator cuff (rotator cuff tear or damage), are commonly found in the general population. Although synovitis of the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints may be seen in rheumatiod arthritis (RA), periarticular shoulder problems may also occur. There are a variety of structures that can become painful and might be interpreted as arthritis by patients. Causes of joint pain from outside the joint (structures inside the joint capsule) can be from "periarticular" (near the joint) structures. The following is a list of structures around a joint that might present as joint pain.
Periarticular causes of joint painBursitisFasciitisTendonitisLigament InjuryEpicondylitisFibromyalgia

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Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures
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Fractures of the pelvis and acetabulum are among the most serious injuries treated by orthopaedic surgeons. Often the result of a traumatic incident such as a motor vehicle accident or a bad fall, these fractures require rapid and precise treatment and, in some cases, one or more surgical procedures. People of all ages are vulnerable to these injuries. In addition, some elderly patients with fragile bones due to osteoporosis develop pelvic fractures and fractures of the acetabulum with a lower impact fall. The acetabulum is the socket of the ball-and-socket hip joint. The top of the thigh bone (femur) forms the ball, and the socket (acetabulum) is part of the pelvic bone. The acetabulum is part of the pelvis. The part of the pelvis that forms the hip socket is the acetabulum. The acetabulum is round in shape, and covered inside with smooth cartilage. This cartilage forms the smooth surface of the hip joint.Acetabular FracturesAn acetabular fracture occurs when the socket of the hip joint is broken. This is much less common than most fractures of the hip, where the ball of the ball-and-socket joint is broken.
How does an acetabular fracture occur?Acetabular fractures either occur with high-energy trauma (e.g. auto collisions, falls, etc.) or as an insufficiency fracture. In younger patients, there is almost always significant trauma, and commonly associated injuries, when an acetabular fracture occurs. In elderly patients, acetabular fractures can occur due to bone weakened from osteoporosis.What is the treatment of an acetabular fracture?In patients who have a traumatic acetabular fracture, the treatment depends on the extent of cartilage displacement, and hip instability. The hip joint should be stable (the ball held tightly within the socket) and the cartilage should be smoothly contoured. Surgery is often recommended for:Aligning the cartilage surfaceRemoving debris (bone) from within the hip jointRestoring stability of the hipElderly patients have surgery less frequently, and fractures may be allowed to heal even if the alignment is not perfect. Whether or not surgery is performed, patients must minimize the weight they place on the affected extremity, often for up to three months. Patients are usually allowed to place their foot on the ground (touch-down weight-bearing), but no more force is allowed on the leg. Walking on the extremity too soon risks further displacement of the broken fragments of bone.

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Fractures In Children, Adults, And The Elderly
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Fractures in ChildrenBroken bones, or fractures, are common in childhood and often happen when kids are playing or participating in sports. Most fractures occur in the upper extremities: the wrist, the forearm, and above the elbow (or elbow fractures). Why? When kids fall, it's a natural instinct for them to throw their hands out in an attempt to stop the fall. Although many kids will have a broken bone at some point, it can be scary for them and parents alike.Causes of Fractures in childrenFractures occur when there is more force applied to the bone than the bone can absorb. Bones are weakest when they are twisted. Breaks in bones can occur from falls, trauma, or as a result of a direct blow or kick to the body. Juvenile osteoporosis is another common cause of fractures in children.
Symptoms of a Broken BoneChildren's bones are more flexible and can absorb shock better than adult bones, so they don't break as easily, but if a bone is under too much pressure, it can still break. It might be tough for you to tell if your toddler has a broken bone, but here are some signs:A snapping soundBruisingSwellingTenderness to touchSevere pain, especially in one spotStiffnessIncreased pain with any movementInability or unwillingness to use the limb (but if your child can move his limb or digit, that doesn't mean that it's not broken)A limb or joint that seems bent or out of position

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