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Paediatric Orthopaedic

Leading Service Provider of Knock Knees & Bow Legs, Club Foot Treatment, Flat Foot, Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis, Knee Replacement and Growing Pains from Aurangabad.

Knock Knees & Bow Legs
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Knock Knees & Bow Legs

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LocationAurangabad
Treatment TypeSurgical/ Non-Surgical
Treatment AreaLeg
UsageFor the treatment of bow legs and knock knees
Age GroupAll
TypeAllopathic

Although infants are born with bowlegs, where the knees appear to "bow" out from the body, the knees tend to straighten out between 18 and 24 months of age. This means that when most children begin to walk, at around 12 months of age, they appear to be bow-legged. Knock knees, on the other hand, are when the knees appear to bend toward each other. If a child has knocked knees, it will be most evident when he or she is around 3 years of age, and will then gradually become less pronounced. By age 7, these children will have attained the normal adult amount of slight knock-knee — 5 to 9 degrees — which they will maintain throughout their lives.
Bow LegsBowlegs are a condition in which the knees stay wide apart when a person stands with the feet and ankles together. In children under 18 months, bowing of legs is considered normal. Causes Infants are born bow legged because of their folded position in the uterus. The baby bowed legs begin to straighten once the child starts to walk and the legs begin to bear weight (about 12 to 18 months old). By around age 3, the child can usually stand with the ankles apart and the knees just touching. If the bowed legs are still present, the child is called bowlegged. Bowlegs may be caused by illnesses such as:Blount's diseaseBone dysplasia (abnormal development)Fractures that do not heal correctlyLead or fluoride poisoningRickets, which is caused by a vitamin D deficiencySymptomsKnees do not touch when standing with feet together (ankles touching)Bowing of legs is same on both side of the body (symmetrical)Bowed legs continue beyond age 3

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Club Foot Treatment
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Club Foot Treatment

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LocationAurangabad
UsageFor the treatment of twisted or misshaped or positioned foot in babies
Treatment TypeAllopathic
TypeSurgical/Non Surgical
GenderAny
Age Group0 to 3 years

Clubfoot describes a range of foot abnormalities usually present at birth (congenital) in which your baby's foot is twisted out of shape or position. The term "clubfoot" refers to the way the foot is positioned at a sharp angle to the ankle, like the head of a golf club. Clubfoot is a relatively common birth defect in children and is usually an isolated problem for an otherwise healthy newborn. Clubfoot can be mild or severe, affecting one or both feet. Clubfoot will hinder your child's development once it's time for your child to walk, so treating clubfoot soon after birth is generally recommended. Treatment is usually successful, and the appearance and function of your child's foot should show improvement.Causes of Clubbed FeetThe cause of club feet isn't known (idiopathic). But scientists do know that clubfoot isn't caused by the position of the fetus in the uterus. In some cases, clubfoot can be associated with other congenital abnormalities of the skeleton, such as spina bifida, a serious birth defect that occurs when the tissue surrounding the developing spinal cord of a fetus doesn't close properly. Environmental factors play a role in causing clubfoot. Studies have strongly linked clubfoot to cigarette smoking during pregnancy, especially when a family history of clubfoot is already present.

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Flat Foot
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Flat Foot

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Flat foot is a condition where the longitudinal arch or instep of the foot collapses and comes in contact with the ground. In infants and toddlers, the longitudinal arch is not developed and flat feet are normal. In some cases, the longitudinal arch never develops resulting in the development of flat foot in children. Most children with flat feet do not cause pain or other problems. Flat feet may be associated with pronation, a leaning inward of the ankle bones toward the center line.Symptoms of a Flat FootSome common symptoms of a flat foot and their subsequent problems include:A flat look to one or both of your feetUneven shoe wear and collapse of your shoe toward the inside of your flat footLower leg painPain on the inside of your ankleSwelling along the inside of your ankleFlat foot painRunning is a problem in case of flat feet

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Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis
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Slipped Capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a disease of the hip where the top of the thighbone slips out of place. The top part of the thighbone is shaped like a ball (femoral head). It fits into the hip socket. The ball is connected to the straight part of the thighbone by the growth plate. The growth plate is an area of tissue that, in children, is still developing. In SCFE, the top or cap of the ball slips off the femoral head through the growth plate. Almost all children with the condition have surgery. Most do well. But some develop problems later due to the condition. One foot might point outward more than the other, or one leg may be slightly longer than the other. Blood may stop flowing to the top part of the thighbone. Children's hips may be stiff, and they may be more likely to develop arthritis at an early age. Other children with more severe slips have a greater risk that the fracture will not heal.Slipped Femoral Epiphysis in ChildrenBoth boys and girls get SCFE. They are almost always approaching their teenage years or just into them (adolescents) when the problem occurs. Several other factors can contribute to a child's chances of having the problem. SCFE is more likely to develop in:Overweight childrenChildren with a family history of SCFEChildren who have diseases of the endocrine system which produces hormones. Diabetes and Cushing syndrome are examples of endocrine system diseases.Children with kidney failure, thyroid problems or growth hormone abnormalities

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Knee Replacement
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Knee Replacement

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Knee replacement surgery which is also known as Knee Arthroplasty is done to relieve pain and restore function in poorly functioning and severely affected knee joints.  With the advancement of technology, you can now choose from a wide variety of designs depending upon your age, weight, activity level and overall physical health. Most knee replacement prosthesis aim to duplicate the ability of a natural knee to roll and glide as it bends.

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Growing Pains
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Growing Pains

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Your child wakes up crying in the night complaining that his legs are throbbing. You rub them and soothe him as much as you can, but you're uncertain about whether to give him any medication or take him to the doctor. Sound familiar? Your child is probably experiencing growing pains, a normal occurrence in about 25% to 40% of children. They generally strike during two periods: in early childhood among 3- to 5-year-olds and, later, in 8- to 12-year-olds. Growing pains are quite rare in toddlers and teenagers. Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably won't have to go to the doctor for them. But they can hurt. Doctors don't believe that growing actually causes pain, but growing pains stop when kids stop growing. By the teen years, most kids don't get growing pains anymore. Kids get growing pains in their legs. Most of the time they hurt in the front of the thighs (the upper part of your legs), in the calves (the back part of your legs below your knees), or behind the knees. Usually, both legs hurt. Growing pains often start to ache right before bedtime. Sometimes you go to bed without any pain, but you might wake up in the middle of the night with your legs hurting. The best news about growing pains is that they go away by morning.What causes growing pains in childrenGrowing pains don't hurt around the bones or joints (the flexible parts that connect bones and let them move) — only in the muscles. For this reason, some doctors believe that kids might get growing pains because they've tired out their muscles. When you run, climb, or jump a lot during the day, you might have aches and pains in your legs at night.

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Developmental Dysplasia Of The Hip
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Developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH) is an abnormal formation of the hip joint in which the ball on top of the thighbone (femur) is not held firmly in the socket. In some instances, the ligaments of the hip joint may be loose and stretched. The condition is found in babies or young children. The degree of hip looseness, or instability, varies in DDH. In some children, the thighbone is simply loose in the socket at birth. In other children, the bone is completely out of the socket. In still other children, the looseness worsens as the child grows and becomes more active. Pediatricians screen for DDH at a newborn's first examination and at every well-baby checkup thereafter. When the condition is detected at birth, it can usually be corrected. But if the hip is not dislocated at birth, the condition may not be noticed until the child begins walking. At this time, treatment is more complicated and uncertain. Left untreated, DDH can lead to pain and osteoarthritis by early adulthood. It may produce a difference in leg length or a "duck-like" gait and decreased agility. If treated successfully (and the earlier the better), children regain normal hip joint function. However, even with appropriate treatment, especially in children 2 years or older, hip deformity and osteoarthritis may develop later in life.

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Intoe Gait
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Intoe Gait

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Intoeing means that when a child walks or runs, the feet turn inward instead of pointing straight ahead. It is commonly referred to as being "pigeon-toed." Intoeing is often first noticed by parents when a baby begins walking, but children at various ages may display intoeing for different reasons. Occasionally, severe intoeing may cause infants and young children to stumble or trip as they catch their toes on the other heel. This kind of feet deformity usually does not cause pain, nor does it lead to arthritis. In the vast majority of children younger than 8 years old, intoeing will almost always correct itself without the use of casts, braces, surgery, or any special treatment. A child whose intoeing is associated with pain, swelling, or a limp should be evaluated by an orthopaedic surgeon. In most cases this is an entirely benign condition and is a feature of normal variation of growth pattern.Symptoms of Intoe GaitLack of any symptoms such as pain, symmetrical deformities, absence of any stiffness in the affected joints and no associated systemic disorders or syndromes indicates a benign condition with excellent long-term outcome. Most children with this feet deformity spontaneously stop intoeing before the age of 9 years. No treatment is therefore required in the majority of cases.

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Apophysitis
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Apophysitis

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Apophysitis is a painful inflammation of the heel's growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 years old, because the heel bone (calcaneus) is not fully developed until at least age 14. Until then, new bone is forming at the growth plate (physis), a weak area located at the back of the heel. When there is too much repetitive stress on the growth plate, inflammation can develop. Calcaneal apophysitis is also called Sever's disease or Sever's syndrome, although it is not a true "disease." This Severs condition is the most common cause of heel pain in children, and can occur in one or both feet. Heel pain in children differs from the most common type of heel pain experienced by adults. While heel pain in adults usually subsides after a period of walking, pediatric heel pain generally doesn't improve in this manner. In fact, walking typically makes the pain worse.CausesApophysitis is an overuse injury that typically occurs after repetitive activities of the muscles attached to the apophysis. Adolescents with excessively tight hip and thigh muscles are more prone to pelvis/hip apophysitis. The apophyses most commonly affected are the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS), the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the iliac crest. The muscles that attach to these apophyses flex the hip and rotate and twist the pelvis and trunk. Apophysitis of the pelvis/hip usually affects runners, sprinters, dancers, soccer players, and ice hockey players.

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Calcaneovalgus Foot
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Calcaneovalgus Foot

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This is a one of the most common foot deformities in children (problem with the shape of the foot) wherein the foot points upward and outward. In extreme cases, the top of the foot touches the front of the lower leg. The condition is congenital, meaning your child was born with it. It may affect one or both feet. Calcaneovalgus causes the baby no pain, and often goes away on its own.Signs and SymptomsThis foot defect, present at birth has no symptoms.The foot is markedly dorsiflexed, with the dorsum of the foot resting against the anterior tibia.The hindfoot is held in valgus and, occasionally, a contracture of the anterior muscles (dorsiflexors) is present.The deformity usually is supple, and the foot can be passively plantarflexed easily.
Causes of CalcaneovalgusThe main cause is thought to be squeezing of the foot due to the child's being "packed" in the uterus during the last few months of pregnancy. Calcaneovalgus runs in families, and more girls than boys have it.How Is Calcaneovalgus Foot Diagnosed?Calcaneovalgus is easily found by looking at the foot when the child is born. The doctor will rule out other congenital deformities of the foot.

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Paediatric Orthopaedic

Paediatric Orthopaedic

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