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Sports Surgery

Pioneers in the industry, we offer Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Meniscus Injury, Slap Tear, Rotator Cuff Injury, Kinetic Chain Assessment and Shoulder Surgery from India.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament
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The ACL is a broad ligament joining the anterior tibial plateau to the posterior femoral intercondylar notch.The tibial attachment is to a facet, in front of, and lateral to the anterior tibial spine.The femoral attachment is high on the posterior aspect of th e lateral wall of the intercondylar notch.

Common causes of ACL Injury

The most common cause of ACL rupture isACL Tear:
  • A traumatic force to the knee in a twisting moment.
  • A direct or an indirect force.
  • Sudden un prepared side-stepping, pivoting
  • Landing from a jump.
  • Contact sports Injury such as football field, on the snow fields
  • A motor vehicle accident

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Meniscus Injury
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Meniscus Injury

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There are two menisci in your knee; each rests between the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia). Meniscus Tear RepairThe menisci are made of tough cartilage and conform to the surfaces of the bones upon which they rest.

One meniscus is on the inside of your knee; this is the me-dial meniscus. The other meniscus rests on the outside of your knee, the lateral menis-cus.

The meniscus is C-shaped and has a wedged profile. The wedged profile helps maintain the stability of the joint by keeping the rounded femur surface from sliding off the flat tibial surface.

The meniscus is nourished by small blood vessels, but the meniscus also has a large area in the center that has no direct blood supply (avascular). This presents a problem when there is an injury to the meniscus as the avascular areas tend not to heal. Without the essential nutrients supplied by blood vessels, healing cannot take place.

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Slap Tear
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Slap Tear

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The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint, similar to the hip; however, the socket of the shoulder joint is extremely shallow, and thus inherently unstable. This means that the bones of the shoulder are not held in place adequately, and therefore extra support is needed.

To compensate for the shallow socket, the shoulder joint has a cuff of cartilage called  labrum that forms a cup for the end of the arm bone (humerus) to move within. The labrum circles the shallow shoulder socket (the glenoid) to make the socket deeper. This cuff of car-tilage makes the shoulder joint much more stable, and allows for a very wide range of move-ments (in fact, the range of movements your shoulder can make far exceeds any other joint in the body).

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Rotator Cuff Injury
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Rotator Cuff Injury

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Shoulder injuries are fairly common, especially for people who tend to exercise a lot Some of the most common shoulder injuries are called "rotator cuff" injuries

Anatomy:

  • The shoulder joint joins the upper body to the arm.
  • The bones included in the shoulder joint are the following:
  • Scapula, or shoulder blade bone
  • Humerus, or upper arm bone
  • The shoulder bones are covered by tissue called cartilage.
  • The smooth surfaces of the cartilage allow for smooth, painless movement in the shoulder joint
  • Ligaments connect the bones and help to keep the shoulder in place Shoulder muscles that are attached
  • This allows the to the shoulder blade are anchored in the head of the humerus shoulder to move in all directions
  • The combination of the muscles and ligaments in the shoulder is called the "rotator cuff"
  • The rotator cuff is located under part of the shoulder blade
  • The "bursa" is a fluid-filled sac that is located between the shoulderjomt and the rotator cuff This prevents the rotator cuff from rubbing against the shoulder.

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Kinetic Chain Assessment
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Kinetic Chain Assessment

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(1) the core stability test,
(2) the shoulder flexibility test,
(3) the scapula stabilization test,
(4) the rotator cuff strength test,
(5) the vertical jump test.

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Shoulder Surgery
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Shoulder Surgery

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 Common Shoulder in Sports

  • Instability.
  • Labral Tear.
  • Muscle and Tendon pathologies.
  • Impingement Syndromes.

Instability: This can be divided into anterior, posterior and inferior instability. Can be caused either due to static or dynamic factors. Static factors include damage to the anterior capsule, glenoid labrum and glenohumeral ligaments caused due to repeated stretching of these structures. The single detrimental factor causing dynamic instability is the weakness or fatigue of the rotator cuff muscles which places the capsule under stress.
Tests for instability:

  •  
    • Anterior: loading and shift test, Crank test
    • Posterior: loading and shift test, Stress test
    • Inferior: Sulcus sign
    • Rowe’s test for multidirectional instability 

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Bankart Tear

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Bankart lesions are  type of labral tear. They occur as a result of a shoulder dislocation or multiple dislocations. When the ball (humeral head) dislocates out of the socket (glenoid), the ligaments that normally hold these two structures together will either stretch or tear.
When they tear it is called a Bankart Lesion. In this case the inferior (i.e. lower) glenohumeral ligament pulls the inferior labrum away from the glenoid.
Less commonly the ligament will pull the labrum with a  piece of bone—this is known as a  bony Bankart lesion It is an indication for surgery and often accompanied by a Hill-Sachs lesion, damage to the posterior humeral head.

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Retrocalcaneal Bursitis

Retrocalcaneal Bursitis

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