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Om Sai Bone Joint & Physiotherapy Clinic - Nursing Homes / Clinics / Hospitals of broken bones and treatment services, joint replacement treatment services & knee pain treatment services in Delhi.

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Nursing Homes / Clinics / Hospitals

Broken Bones And Treatment Services
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Overview of Fractures

A fracture means a break in a bone. If the broken bone pierces the skin, it is called an open or compound fracture; otherwise, it is considered a closed fracture. Fractures, commonly, occur secondary to car accidents, falls, sports injuries, low bone density, osteoporosis or tumors near bones. Overuse of an extremity can also produce stress fractures. Stress fractures are minute cracks in the bone.

A displaced fractures must be aligned and maintained in position during the healing process so the end result shows both a cosmetically and a functionally normal bone. If the fracture enters a joint, the joint surface must line up perfectly or overtime, arthritis begins and progresses to limited function and pain.

What are symptoms of fractures ? One can suspect a fracture if the limb or joint is out-of-place or misshapen, swelling, bruising or bleeding occurs over a bony site, severe pain transpires in the area over a bone, numbness or tingling appear, limited mobility occurs or the limb cannot be moved. If one suspects a fracture, the person needs to seek medical care right away. What are the different types of fractures ?
  • With simple fractures, the bone breaks in only one place.
  • With comminuted fractures, the bone breaks in multiple places with at least three bone fragments at the fracture site.
  • With open fractures, a skin injury occurs and the bone protrudes through the skin (it is also called a “compound” fracture.
  • With closed fractures, the skin remains intact over the broken bone.
  • With undisplaced fractures, the broken bone pieces remain aligned or perfectly adjacent to the original bone.
  • With displaced fractures, the broken bone pieces scatter from the original bone site.

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Joint Replacement Treatment Services
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What is joint replacement surgery ? Joint replacement surgery encompasses removing a damaged joint and surgically replacing it with an entire new joint or a part of a joint. Joint sites in the human body mean places where two or more bones come together, such as the knee, hip or shoulder. The most frequently replaced joints involve the hip and knee, but other joints being replaced include ankles, elbows, fingers, wrist and shoulders. The type of doctor performing the surgery is called an orthopedic surgeon. Why replace a joint ? Joints in your body undergo damage from arthritis, fractures, other diseases, and injuries. Damage to the cartilage lining the ends of the bones creates joint pain, stiffness limping, muscle weakness, limitation of motion and swelling. Individuals complain about the problems encountered in performing ordinary activities like walking, putting on socks and shoes, entering and exiting their car and climbing stairs. Physicians try non-surgical modes of treatment like medications, physical therapy and alterations to daily activities. If these treatments fail to relieve pain and debility, your physician may advise joint replacement surgery. What is the replacement joint like ? A replacement joint, called a prosthesis, can be constructed of plastic, metal or ceramic. The prosthesis replicates the action of a natural, healthy joint. Surgeons place cemented joints more frequently in older individuals who fail to move around a lot. The cement makes the new joint adhere to the bone. Surgeons recommend uncemented joints for younger, more active people and individuals with healthy bones. Uncemented takes longer to heal due to the need for the bone to grow and attach to the prosthesis. Do a lot of people obtain joint replacements ?

The number of people obtaining joint replacements increases every year. Greater than 1 million Americans acquire a hip or knee replacement each year. Since older individuals express a decrease in pain and an improvement in moving around, this older age group describes the improvement in their quality of life after the surgery.

Every surgery presents some risks, but risk of joint replacement surgery depends on the state of health before surgery, how severe you disease is, and type of surgery planned.

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Knee Pain Treatment Services
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Understanding your Knee Structure or Anatomy

The knee represents one of the most used and highly complicated joints in the body. Four bones come together to form your knee. The thigh bone, called the femur, joins to the front bone below the knee, named the tibia. The bone below the knee, labeled the fibula, rests beside or slightly behind the tibia; whereas, the kneecap, named the patella, rests on top of your joint.

Cartilage, a thick, flexible tissue at the end of your bones, acts as a shock-absorbing cushion between your bones. Around the knee, a piece of cartilage goes by the name of meniscus. The two cartilages, the medial and lateral menisci, protect the site between the femur and tibia.

Two key structures fasten the knee muscles and bones together. Tendons perform, similar to tight rubber bands, to attach the knee bones to the leg muscles and allow movement of the joint. Ligaments connect the knee bones and act as rigid ropes to keep the joint stable.

Fluid-filled sacs, called bursa, sit between the structures of the knee so the joint can move smoothly. Synovial fluid fills the bursa like soapy water and acts to reduce the friction between the bones.

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Foot And Ankle Treatment Services
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The Structure of the Foot

The foot contains a total of 26 bones. The foot can be divided into three sections. The three sections consist of the forefoot (toe area), the midfoot (arch of foot) and the hindfoot (heel and ankle). Each section contains a different number of bones and varied bone shapes.

Forefoot: 19 total bones with 14 phalanges and 5 metatarsals;Midfoot: 5 total bones with 3 cuneiform bones, 1 cuboid bone and 1 navicular bone;Hindfoot: 2 total bones with 1 talus bone and 1 calcaneus bone.

The hindfoot contains the talus that sits on top of the calcaneus. The talus connects the foot to the ankle by creating a joint with the tibia and fibula bones of the lower legs.

Twenty muscles provide the foot with shape by holding the bones in position and imparting movement. The main muscles of the foot include the anterior tibial (moves foot forward), posterior tibial (supports the arch), peroneal tibial (outside ankle movement), extensors (helps raise the toes), and flexors (stabilize toes near the ground).

Many elastic tendons connect the muscles to the many bones. The achilles tendon extends from the calf muscle to the heel and is the most prominent and powerful tendon in the foot.

The numerous ligaments connect bone to bone throughout the bones in the foot. The plantar fascia represents the longest and most conspicuous ligament in the foot. It runs from the heel to the toes and forms the arch on the bottom of the foot. It stretches and contracts to provide balance and foot strength to the act of walking. Medial ligaments on the inside and lateral ligaments on the outside of the foot allow the foot to move up and down.

Ankle cartilage, a spongy tissue, covers the end of the tibia and fibula bones where the joint meets the talus bone. The cartilage absorbs shock and allows the bones to easily slide over each other. Cartilage also exists in all the bone to bone joints present in the foot.

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Spine Treatment Services
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Spine Treatment Services

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Structure of your spine

The spine or backbone represents the portion of your skeleton that stretches down the middle of your back. It functions to hold up the head, to provide your body with upright posture for moving around on two legs and to act as a firm tunnel-like cover over your spinal cord.

Our spine contains 33 vertebra bones with the ones at the bottom of the spine (coccygeal area) being fused together. The vertebral regions consists of 7 neck (cervical), 12 chest (thoracic), 5 lower back (lumbar), 5 pelvis (sacral), and 4 tailbone (coccygeal) vertebrae. The vertebra bones fit snuggly next to each other like puzzle pieces.

The muscles function with ligaments to sustain the spine, keep it upright and regulate movement. Muscles receive their names from their shape, location or a combination of these two descriptors along with action categories like flexion (bent toward the body), extension (extend away from the body) or rotation (rotate or turn around). For example, the erector spinae, two muscle groups running parallel on each side of the spine (spinae is Latin for spine), receive their named from the location.

Tendons refer to fibrous tissues that attach the muscle to the bone. Without tendons, the muscles would fail to sit neatly compressed next to the spinal bones.

Ligaments describe strong bands that connect two bones. The function of these bands is to hold the individual vertebrae segments together in the backbone.

The cartilage or discs provide a cushion between the vertebrae (spine bones). These discs, located between ever vertebrae, act as spongy pads filled with gel-like fluid to protect the bones from rubbing against each other. You hear a lot about ruptured discs or slipped disc in the back and these will be described later.

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